Posts Tagged ‘rss feed’

Print section
Print Rubric: 

Douglas Irwin corrects the record of American trade policy over the years

Print Headline: 

Sticking up for a scapegoat

Print Fly Title: 

A history of trade

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

A hated tax but a fair one

Fly Title: 

Scapegoating trade

Main image: 

20171125_BKP001_0.jpg

Clashing over Commerce: A History of US Trade Policy. By Douglas Irwin. University of Chicago Press; 832 pages; $35.
TRADE-policy wonks are gluttons for punishment. In good times, their pet topic is dismissed as dull. In bad, they find trade being faulted for everything. As Donald Trump blames America’s economic woes on terrible trade deals, one geek is fighting back. In “Clashing over Commerce”, Douglas Irwin of Dartmouth College tells the history of American trade policy, showing that trade is neither dull nor deserving of the attacks on …

via Economic Crisis http://ift.tt/2jiT8xf

Advertisements

Print section
Print Rubric: 

Timelier loan-loss provisions may make earnings and lending choppier

Print Headline: 

Stage fright

Print Fly Title: 

Accounting and banks

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

The army sidelines Robert Mugabe, Africa’s great dictator

Fly Title: 

Standard stuff

Main image: 

20171118_FNP505.jpg

IN THE first quarter of 2018 thousands of banks will look a little less profitable. A new international accounting standard, IFRS 9, will oblige lenders in more than 120 countries, including the European Union’s members, to increase provisions for credit losses. In America, which has its own standard-setter, IFRS 9 will not be applied—but by 2019 banks there will also have to follow a slightly different regime.
The new rule has its roots in the financial crisis of 2007-08, in the wake of which the leaders of the G20 countries declared that …

via Economic Crisis http://ift.tt/2ARwq7D

Print section
Print Rubric: 

The big risks may be in corporate, not government, bonds

Print Headline: 

Yielding to temptation

Print Fly Title: 

Buttonwood

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

Do social media threaten democracy?

Fly Title: 

Buttonwood

FOR the umpteenth time in the past decade, a great turning-point has been declared in the government-bond market. Bond yields have risen across the world, including in China, where the yield on the ten-year bond has come close to 4% for the first time since 2014. The ten-year Treasury-bond yield, the most important benchmark, has risen from 2.05% in early September to 2.37%, though that is still below its level of early March (see chart).
Investors have been expecting bond yields to rise for a while. A survey by JPMorgan Chase found that a record 70% of its clients with speculative accounts had “short” positions in Treasury bonds—ie, betting that prices would fall and that …

via Economic Crisis http://ift.tt/2Ac7jfa

There are 767 million people in the world who live in extreme poverty — $1.90 a day or less for daily needs. But you can have more than that and still be considered poor. So the World Bank has now set two poverty lines for middle-income countries.

If you live on $1.90 a day or less, the World Bank says you are extremely poor. Two new poverty lines offer a way to measure poverty in middle income countries.

(Image credit: Matthew Zhang/NPR)

via Economy : NPR http://ift.tt/2zPt98f

Print section
Print Rubric: 

Agreement on how to fight recessions in a low-interest-rate world remains elusive

Print Headline: 

The low road

Print Fly Title: 

Free exchange

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

The right way to help declining places

Fly Title: 

Free exchange

ONE day, perhaps quite soon, it will happen. Some gale of bad news will blow in: an oil-price spike, a market panic or a generalised formless dread. Governments will spot the danger too late. A new recession will begin. Once, the response would have been clear: central banks should swing into action, cutting interest rates to boost borrowing and investment. But during the financial crisis, and after four decades of falling interest rates and inflation, the inevitable occurred (see chart). The rates so deftly wielded by central banks hit zero, leaving policymakers grasping at untested alternatives. Ten years on, despite exhaustive debate, economists …

via Economic Crisis http://ift.tt/2x9lvnm

Print section

Print Headline: 

A devil to sup with

Print Fly Title: 

Herbert Hoover

UK Only Article: 
standard article

Issue: 

The right way to help declining places

Fly Title: 

20th-century American history

Main image: 

20171021_bkp505.jpg

Hoover: An Extraordinary Life in Extraordinary Times. By Kenneth Whyte. Knopf; 752 pages; $35.
FOR his philanthropic efforts during the first world war, Herbert Hoover was described as a “man who began his career in California and will end it in heaven”. In a new biography, Kenneth Whyte lists the many hardships Hoover went through. Generally, he used them to his advantage—to increase his wealth, achieve fame and become America’s 31st president. At least, that is, until the Great Depression, which ruined him politically.

Born in Iowa in 1874, Hoover became determined early in life to earn a fortune for the security and independence it would bring. After graduating as a geologist from …

via Economic Crisis http://ift.tt/2x9OTtQ

Nearly 11 percent of the world’s population lives on less than two dollars a day, according to the World Bank.

(Image credit: EITAN ABRAMOVICH/AFP/Getty Images)

via Economy : NPR http://ift.tt/2yvhLhL