The Economist explains: Why America’s Federal Reserve might make money disappear

Posted: April 17, 2017 in economy
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BEFORE the financial crisis, America’s Federal Reserve held assets worth around $850bn. Today, the central bank’s balance-sheet is more than five times as large, at $4.5trn. It grew during and after the financial crisis as the Fed purchased vast quantities of government bonds and mortgage-backed securities using newly created money, most of it under a policy known as quantitative easing (QE). Now the Fed is preparing to sell some assets, and retire the corresponding money. Why and how will it do this?The Fed resorted to QE to stimulate the economy after it had moved the short-term interest rate, its usual policy instrument, as low as it could go. Debate rages over how, exactly, QE worked; Ben Bernanke, the former Fed chairman, once quipped that the policy “works in practice but not in theory”. But it is clear enough that QE pushed up the price of long-term bonds. This put downward pressure on long-term interest rates (which move inversely to bond prices). Today, however, the Fed, now led by Janet Yellen (pictured), is raising short-term rates, as it tries to keep a lid on inflation. So—the logic goes—it should also shrink its balance-sheet, to push up long-term rates.There are different ways to shrink the balance-sheet. The most aggressive approach would be to sell bonds. This would …

via Economic Crisis http://ift.tt/2ollrvq

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