Faith leaders are renewing Martin Luther’s King’s effort to demand better jobs and living conditions for the poor, by organizing demonstrations across the country to highlight the issue of poverty.

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An exhibit at the National Building Museum has been adapted from Matthew Desmond’s 2017 Pulitzer-Prize-winning book Eviction: Poverty and Profit in the American City into an “immersive” experience.

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Matthew Desmond estimates that about 2.3 million evictions were filed in the U.S. in 2016 — a rate of four every minute. “Eviction isn’t just a condition of poverty; it’s a cause of poverty,” he says.

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“… it is a cruel jest to say to a bootless man that he ought to lift himself by his own bootstraps.”

(Image credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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The town sign stands in the snow at the entrance to Davos, Switzerland, host to the 48th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum taking place this week. Donald Trump will be among the attendees.

The annual report is intended for the rich and powerful who gather in Davos to talk about world poverty. And it causes the Twittersphere to flare up.

(Image credit: David Keyton/AP)

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Across Twitter, people in the development community were outraged that so few women were named on the list.

(Image credit: Hanna Barczyk for NPR)

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Much has been done to strengthen Europe’s banking system. But not enough

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A job half-finished

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European banks

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How—and why—to end the war in Yemen

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THE permanent revolution rumbles on. Ten years after the financial crisis, Europe’s bankers must wonder whether the regulatory upheaval will ever cease (see article). Next month two European Union directives start to bite. MiFID2 will make trading more transparent and oblige banks to charge clients separately for research; PSD2 will expose banks to more competition from technology companies, and each other, in everything from payment services to budgeting advice. A new accounting rule, IFRS 9, also kicks in, demanding timelier provisions for credit …

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